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Please do not copy(steal) my images to your computer.
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Monday, 31 January 2011

HUNTINGDON CROSS

HUNTINGDON CROSS - DARTMOOR
This cross is situated in a hollow near the Western Wella Brook on Dartmoor. It is 5Km from Didworthy and just 1Km from the old clapper bridge. It is a boundary marker and was set up in the 16th century after Buckfast Abbey had suffered dissolution. The wall seen behind the cross is of more recent construction.

This marker is beside the Ancient Abbots Path which at this point forms part of the Two Moors Way which is one of the National Trails. The cross makes a good lunch stop for walkers on the trail.

Thursday, 27 January 2011

DEATH.....



Nor dread nor hope attend
A dying animal;
A man awaits his end
Dreading and hoping all;
Many times he died,
Many times rose again.
A great man in his pride
Confronting murderous men
Casts derision upon
Supersession of breath;
He knows death to the bone
Man has created death. 

William Butler Yeats 1865-1939  

Monday, 24 January 2011

THE DERRICK

THE DERRICK AT PORTLAND BILL
Portland is famous for it's stone which has been used extensively as a building material throughout the British Isles. Buildings that have used the stone include St Paul's Cathedral and Buckingham Palace.The Cenotaph in Whitehall is also made from Portland Stone.
The stone is also exported to many other countries - for example it was used in the construction of the United Nations Headquarters in New York city in the USA.
The stone is a Limestone from the Tithonian stage of the Jurassic period.
A few hundred yards from Portland Bill lighthouse (which was shown in a recent posting ) can be found this Derrick. Cut stone slabs used to be transported from this point by sea to various destinations. A Derrick was used to lift the stone on to the sea going barges.

Thursday, 20 January 2011

ON THE MOOR

ON THE MOOR ABOVE TAVISTOCK
Dartmoor is an area of the country that I visit often. My wife was brought up close to the town of Tavistock and I often spend time walking and camping in the area.
The moor covers an area of 954 square kilometres (368 square miles) and the granite upland dates from the Carboniferous period of geological history. The highest point of the moor is High Wilhays at 621 metres (2037 feet). The whole area of the moor and the towns and villages in it's vicinity is a very popular tourist destination .
T

Sunday, 16 January 2011

TREE DWELLERS..?

PROOF OF TREE DWELLERS.?
Following on from my last posting I thought that another image from my photo folder marked 'Tree Dwellers' would be in order.
This tree was seen in Llangattock (Llangatwg) which is within the area of the Brecon Beacons National Park (Parc Cenediaethol Bannau Brycheiniog). Whether it is proof that there really are' little people' that live in trees - well who knows....
As with the last posting - no merging of images to create the finished photograph - I do sometimes shoot infra red or solarize in order to give a slightly 'not of this world' effect.

Wednesday, 12 January 2011

GHOSTLY PULPIT.

THE GHOSTLY PULPIT - SUDELEY CASTLE
With a backdrop of the Cotswold hills Studeley Castle is steeped in history. It has royal connections spanning  a thousand years.
The castle was once the home to Queen Katherine Parr the last and surviving wife of Henry V111.
The castle has some truly wonderful gardens and in one small corner can be found this tree with a 'ghostly pulpit' wrapped around it.

Saturday, 8 January 2011

GATE TO A SECRET

GATE TO A SECRET

Behind this gate lies a secret.
For over twenty years this gate has remained shut concealing what is behind
the stone wall. As time passes so the secret becomes greater as nature takes it's hold.

Curious?  Aren't you just a bit Curious?
                          

Wednesday, 5 January 2011

WHATEVER THE WEATHER- THE LIGHT SHINES THROUGH.

PORTLAND BILL LIGHTHOUSE
For nearly 300 years a lighthouse has stood at Portland Bill on the south coast of England. It guides vessels heading for Portland and Weymouth - it also acts as a waymark for vessels navigating in the English channel.
A red sector light warns mariners of the hazardous Shambles Bank which lies about 3 miles off shore.

The lighthouse was established in 1716 and the height of the tower is 41 metres. In 1996 the whole lighthouse became automated with the light flashing 4 times every 20 seconds. The range of the light is 25 nautical miles.
During fog the horn is activated and this gives a 3.5 second blast every 30 seconds.

For some of my childhood years I lived at Portland and the lighthouse was a constant backdrop to a lot of my early adventures.

Saturday, 1 January 2011

LOOKING OUT TO SEA.

LOOKING OUT TO SEA - BOURNEMOUTH


Looking out to sea is similar to looking ahead to a New Year.
You are looking out into the unknown - you never know what will suddenly appear on the horizon.